University of Colorado

Court Urged to Uphold First Amendment In Churchill Case

The AAUP and other groups submitted an amicus brief yesterday to a Colorado Court of Appeals, arguing that the University of Colorado should reinstate a tenured professor whose free speech rights were violated. 

AAUP Issues Statement on UC-Boulder Ideology Survey

Henry Reichman, chair of the AAUP’s Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure, expressed concern that a survey of ideological diversity at the University of Colorado-Boulder could be used to justify a political litmus test for faculty.

AAUP Colorado Conference Condemns University

This statement condemns the University of Colorado’s treatment of a sociology professor as a clear violation of academic freedom and an unwarranted infringement on her professional obligation to choose effective instructional methods to communicate disciplinary knowledge in her classroom.

Academic Freedom Violated at University of Colorado

The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) joins its Colorado state conference in condemning the University of Colorado-Boulder's treatment of sociology professor Patricia Adler.

REPORT ON THE TERMINATION OF WARD CHURCHILL

Ward Churchill was dismissed from the University of Colorado (CU) in 2007, having been convicted of plagiarism as well as fabrication and falsification of evidence for his claims that the United States government had been complicit in the genocide of Native Americans. It was Churchill’s essay of September 12, 2001, that drew attention to him— an essay that called victims of the attack on the World Trade Center “little Eichmanns.” For four years the essay, titled “Some People Push Back,” went unnoticed, but in 2005 it caught the attention of faculty and administrators at Hamilton College in New York, and from there it went viral, becoming the topic of nonstop media commentary that lasted for months.

Ward Churchill at the Dalton Trumbo Fountain: Academic Freedom in the Aftermath of 9/11

How many of the three hundred people who gathered around the Dalton Trumbo Fountain in front of the University of Colorado’s student center on March 3, 2005, to hear Ward Churchill speak understood the irony of the location? Trumbo, a successful screenwriter and Colorado alumnus, had been one of the so-called “Hollywood Ten” who were imprisoned and blacklisted for defying the House Un-American Activities Committee in 1947. Churchill, like Trumbo an outspoken radical, had just become the target of a nationwide campaign to eject him from his position as a tenured professor of American Indian studies on the Colorado faculty. In a hasty essay, written to explain why the perpetrators of the attack on the World Trade Center would have been so hostile to the United States, he had characterized the 9/11 victims as “little Eichmanns.” That unfortunate phrase, unremarked at the time, emerged with a vengeance three years later in conjunction with a planned speech he was to give at Hamilton College in upstate New York. Catapulted into notoriety by right-wing bloggers and talk-show hosts, Churchill then came under attack by Colorado politicians, who forced the university to investigate and then dismiss its controversial faculty member.

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