About the AAUP

The AAUP is a nonprofit membership association of faculty and other academic professionals. Headquartered in Washington, DC, we have members and chapters based at colleges and universities across the country. 

Since our foundation in 1915, the AAUP has helped to shape American higher education by developing the standards and procedures that maintain quality in education and academic freedom in this country's colleges and universities. We define fundamental professional values and standards for higher education, advance the rights of academics, particularly as those rights pertain to academic freedom and shared governance, and promote the interests of higher education teaching and research. 

The AAUP has two sister organizations: 

The AAUP-CBC is a labor union; its members are those chapters of the AAUP that engage in collective bargaining. The AAUP-CBC promotes organizing among tenure-line and contingent faculty, academic professionals, and graduate employees and provides support to member chapters as they work to protect shared governance and academic freedom, to uphold professional standards and values,

The AAUP Foundation is a public charity; it funds, through its grant making process, the charitable and educational purposes of the AAUP, including support for academic freedom and quality higher education.




The mission of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is to advance academic freedom and shared governance; to define fundamental professional values and standards for higher education; to promote the economic security of faculty, academic professionals, graduate students, post‐doctoral fellows, and all those engaged in teaching and research in higher education; to help the higher education community organize to make our goals a reality; and to ensure higher education's contribution to the common good.

AAUP Constitution

The Ninety-Ninth Annual Meeting of the Association amended the constitution of the AAUP.

Annual Meetings

The AAUP Annual Meeting is the business component of the larger Annual Conference, and it has certain responsibilities as laid out in Article VI of the AAUP Constitution.

AAUP Chapter Websites

A list of AAUP chapter and affiliate websites, both unionized and nonunionized. (You can also see a list of just union chapters that belong to the AAUP Collective Bargaining Congress on the AAUP-CBC website.) 

State Conferences

A list of AAUP state-level organizations.

Elected Leaders

The leaders of the Association are drawn from colleges and universities throughout the country. Find out about chapter, state conference, and national leaders.


Staff directory and contact information.


AAUP standing committees work on a variety of topics of importance to higher education and to faculty. In addition to topical standing committees, the AAUP has a number of leadership committees, advisory committees, and business committees. 

History of the AAUP

The AAUP was formed in 1915 by Arthur Lovejoy and John Dewey, in response to an incident at Stanford University several years earlier. Almost a century later, the AAUP is still addressing the kinds of abuse that spurred Lovejoy and Dewey to organize the Association. Academia has changed a lot since 1915, but there are still people who want to control what professors teach and write. Thanks to the AAUP, academic freedom is recognized as the fundamental principle of our profession. Despite this acceptance, academic freedom remains vulnerable. The attacks are more subtle in some cases, but the response must always be decisive.