Academic Freedom

Kansas AAUP Conference Statement

The social media policy passed last week by the Kansas Board of Regents is ill conceived and should be rescinded, says a statement issued by the AAUP's Kansas conference

Academic Freedom and Electronic Communications

A newly revised report issued for comment in December, Academic Freedom and Electronic Communications, brings up to date and expands the Association’s 2004 report on the same topic.

Freedom to Teach Statement

At its November meeting, the AAUP’s Committee A on Academic Freedom and Tenure approved The Freedom to Teach, a short statement written in response to numerous queries regarding Association policy on the relationship between the academic freedom of individual faculty members in the classroom and collective faculty responsibility for the curriculum, particularly with regard to multisection courses.

Report on Academy-Industry Relationships Published in Book Form

The AAUP and the AAUP Foundation are pleased to announce the publication of Recommended Principles to Guide Academy-Industry Relationships. The 368-page report is the product of four years of work. It has been updated, clarified, and extensively edited since a draft was published online for comment in 2012.

One Historian’s Perspective on Academic Freedom and the AAUP

It’s our brand: academic freedom. Whatever else the AAUP does, the defense of academic freedom is what distinguishes it from every other organization. As the American system of higher education has evolved, so, too, has the Association’s mission, but despite embracing collective bargaining and the provision of other services to the professoriate, the AAUP has not abandoned its central concern with protecting the professional autonomy and intellectual integrity of the nation’s faculties.

Anti-Boycott Bill Threatens Academic Freedom

The AAUP has released a statement opposing New York's proposed Assembly Bill A.8392. While the AAUP opposes all academic boycotts, the statement explains that the restrictions threatened by Assembly Bill A.8392 could impose even greater restrictions on academic freedom.

Demers v. Austin, 746 F.3d 402 (9th Cir. Wash. Jan. 29, 2014)

In this important decision, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals reinforced the First Amendment protections for academic speech by faculty members.  Adopting an approach advanced in AAUP’s amicus brief, the court emphasized the seminal importance of academic speech. Accordingly, the court concluded that the Garcetti analysis did not apply to "speech related to scholarship or teaching,” and therefore the First Amendment could protect this speech even when undertaken "pursuant to the official duties" of a teacher and professor.

Controversy in the Classroom

The AAUP clarifies that the group "Students for Academic Freedom," which purports to rely on AAUP principles concerning controversial subject matter, in fact goes well beyond the AAUP's statements and is inimical to academic freedom and the very idea of liberal education. 

AAUP Opposes Anti-Boycott Legislation

The AAUP released a statement opposing legislation (currently pending in New York and Maryland) which would prevent public funds from being used to support organizations which have voted to boycott higher education institutions in other countries.

Proposed Maryland Legislation "Ill-Conceived"

The AAUP and the NCAC criticize academic boycotts, but warn public officials against interference with political expression, open discussion, and debate.

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