Restructuring

Organization of the AAUP

The AAUP has reorganized into three interlocked entities under one AAUP umbrella: the AAUP (a professional association), the AAUP-CBC (a labor union), and the AAUP Foundation (a foundation).

Introducing the New, Restructured AAUP

As of January 1, 2013, the AAUP has reorganized into three interlocked entities under one umbrella. This change will better align our legal status with our evolving activities, our changing membership, and our ambitious aims for future programs and services.

Introducing the New, Restructured AAUP

As of January 1, 2013, the AAUP has reorganized into three interlocked entities under one umbrella. This change will better align our legal status with our evolving activities, our changing membership, and our ambitious aims for future programs and services. We expect that it will allow the more vigorous pursuit of fundraising, legislative lobbying at federal and state levels, program development, and union related activities.

The three entities are the AAUP Foundation, the AAUP Collective Bargaining Congress, and the AAUP.

Cooking the Goose That Lays the Golden Eggs: California’s Higher Education System in Peril: A Master White Paper for the CSU

California’s higher education system, the world’s largest and the pride of the state and nation, faces an unprecedented threat. That threat emanates from the de-funding, privatizing, and dismantling of public institutions. The course and outcome of this battle over higher education, between radically different visions of what constitutes the public interest, will have major repercussions for California, the nation, and the world.

Graduate Student Academic Freedom and the Apprenticeship Myth

In fall 2009, my university’s newly hired director of programs in professional writing circulated a survey asking business writing instructors to note which of the long list of tasks, skills, and assignments they taught in their classes. Many of us blithely responded to the survey: what harm could come from his desire to know the overlaps and discontinuities amongst the program’s instructors, many of whom had been teaching these courses for years? By early spring 2010, we learned that he was not simply gathering information. He announced that he “likely [would] define the core content” of the two major business writing courses, a move that would impose “an instructional core ... of ten weeks.” The survey apparently had been either our only major opportunity to help shape this core or flimsy evidence to justify changes the new director already had planned. His e-mail did assure us that “the program is not proposing or adopting a single pedagogy for all sections”; he merely was dictating 70 percent of what we would teach.

Towards an Autonomous Antioch College: The Story of the Nonstop Liberal Arts Institute

When the Antioch University Board of Trustees announced in June of 2007 that it was closing the historic Antioch College, we all mourned. Then, as Mother Jones recommended, we began to organize. Our goal was to reclaim the college from decades of dysfunctional government that had resulted in the loss of its institutional autonomy and ultimately its closure. This is the story of Antioch College in Exile, the project which became the Nonstop Liberal Arts Institute, an unusual one-year experiment in higher education and one of several strategies employed to save Antioch College from extinction—strategies which, as of this writing, appear to have been successful.

Academic Freedom and the Digital Revolution

In spring 2009, the University of Michigan Press sent out a letter by e-mail to its authors announcing the end of business as usual at the press. Having entered into an agreement with the university library at Michigan, UM Press, the letter stated, had initiated “a transformative scholarly publishing model” in which all publications are to be made available primarily in digital format, with print-on-demand versions of texts available to bookstores, institutions, and individuals (Pochoda, letter). Long-term plans outlined by editor Philip Pochoda call for books to be “digitized and available to libraries and customers world-wide through an affordable sitelicense program,” as most academic journals currently are. The announcement stressed the revolutionary potential inherent in the shift online by suggesting that digital publications will be “candidates for a wide range of audio and visual digital enhancements—including hot links, graphics, interactive tables, sound files, 3D animation, and video.” This is not, in other words, simply a change in models of distribution, but also potentially a radical metamorphosis in modes of scholarship in the humanities.

Subscribe to Restructuring